First review for “The Stars Askew”

The first review for Rjurik Davidson’s “The Stars Askew” has appeared in the wild, as Matt Hlinak of Pop Mythology unpacks the second novel in the Caeli-Amur Series

Matt says:

I have been waiting with anticipation for the follow-up to Rjurik Davidson’s strikingly original debut, Unwrapped Sky (2014), and The Stars Askew does not disappoint. The “young master of the New Weird” fleshes out his wonderfully bizarre world, a world that blends familiar elements of history and mythology in unique ways.

You can read the full review here.

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Relaunched — Unwrapped Sky by Rjurik Davidson

More celebrations for Supernova member Rjurik Davidson, whose debut fantasy novel Unwrapped Sky finally got its Melbourne launch last night at Readings bookshop in Carlton. The novel came out globally in April this year, but since Rjurik was based in Europe at the time, the occasion was not suitably marked by family, friends and fans here in Australia. BANG THE DRUM!

rjurik launch2

The book was relaunched by Jeff Sparrow, editor of literary journal Overland, who interviewed Rjurik about themes of politics and revolution in fantasy (which, unsurprisingly, are the themes of Rjurik’s trilogy).

Unwrapped-Sky-195x300Unwrapped Sky

Caeli-Amur: an ancient city perched on white cliffs overlooking the sea; a city ruled by three Houses, fighting internecine wars; a city which harbours ancient technology and hidden mysteries. But things are changing in Caeli-Amur. Ancient minotaurs arrive for the traditional Festival of the Sun. The slightly built New-Men bring their technology from their homeland. Wastelanders stream into the city hideously changed by the chemical streams to the north. Strikes break out in the factory district.

In a hideout beneath the city, a small group of seditionists debate ways to overthrow the Houses. How can they rouse the citizens of the city? Should they begin a campaign of terror? Is there a way to uncover the thaumaturgical knowledge that the Houses guard so jealously? As the Houses scramble to maintain their rule, it becomes clear that things will change forever in Caeli-Amur.

The book has been getting fantastic reviews since its April launch. Congratulations, Rjurik!

The second book in the series, called The Stars Askew is due out sometime in 2015.

 


Launched – Trucksong by Andrew Macrae

Trucksong2It’s not every day one of Supernova’s members launches a novel, so BANG THE DRUM for Andrew Macrae, who has launched his debut novel Trucksong this week, published by Twelfth Planet Press.

Trucksong is “a dystopian science fiction novel about lost love, AI trucks and the search for meaning in a post-apocalyptic Australia.”

Andrew has written an accompanying soundtrack on the Trucksong web site and also made available as a download the original version of the novel, which was written in ‘experimental’ language.

Recent interviews with Andrew and reviews of the novel are available here:

Congratulations, Andy!


Tor UK Pre-empt Rjurik Davidson’s Fantasy Novels

From the Pan Macmillan website:

Julie Crisp, Editorial Director at Tor UK, has acquired UK rights in two novels by Australian author Rjurik Davidson pre-emptively, from the rights department at Tor Books in New York.

The first is titled Unwrapped Sky, and will be published in spring 2014.  Here are the author’s thoughts on the world he has created:

“Caeli-Amur: a city torn by contradiction. A city of languorous philosopher-assassins and magnificent creatures from ancient myth: minotaurs and sirens. Three Houses rule over an oppressed citizenry stirring into revolt. The ruins of Caeli-Amur’s sister city lie submerged beneath the sea nearby, while the remains of strange advanced technology lie hidden in the tunnels beneath the city itself.

“These combinations fascinate me, for Caeli-Amur stands on the borders between antiquity and modernity, between Ancient Rome and St Petersburg of the early 1900s, between the classical and the avant-garde. The stories that might be told in Caeli-Amur intrigue me, draw me in. The unhappy middle-manager, whose life is a disappointment, the ageing philosopher-assassin, no longer able to ply his trade, the captured Siren who yearns to return to her island, the your seditionist eager to ride on the wave of change that is coming. In Caeli-Amur histories collide and the sparks thrown off can – at least for me – dazzle and intrigue.”

Rjurik Davidson is a freelance writer and Associate Editor of Overland magazine. He has written short stories, essays, screenplays and reviews. His short collection, The Library of Forgotten Books, was recently released by PS Publishing. His work has been published in Postscripts, Years Best Australian Science Fiction and Fantasy, Volumes One, Two and Four, Australian Dark Fantasy and Horror 2006, SciFiction, Aurealis, Borderlands and elsewhere. He has been short-listed for the Ditmar Award for Best Short Story three times, the Aurealis Award once and won the Ditmar award for Best New Talent in 2005.

Julie Crisp commented: “I’m thrilled to have acquired these novels by an up and coming voice in speculative fiction. Unwrapped Sky blew me away with its fresh voice, involved imagination and original storyline. The world building was stunning and I think genre fans are going to completely love this author’s writing”.

Agent John Jarrold sold World rights in this book and its sequel to Jim Frenkel at Tor.


2013 Ditmar Award ballot released

The 2013 Ditmar Award ballot has been released, and features a number of SuperNOVA members (highlighted in bold below).

Voting has now opened, and will remain open until one minute before midnight AEST (ie. 11.59pm, GMT+11),
Thursday, 25th of April, 2013.

You can vote online here, or visit here for more information.

Good luck to all the nominees!

Best Novel

* Sea Hearts, Margo Lanagan (Allen & Unwin)
* Bitter Greens, Kate Forsyth (Random House Australia)
* Suited (The Veiled Worlds 2), Jo Anderton (Angry Robot)
* Salvage, Jason Nahrung (Twelfth Planet Press)
* Perfections, Kirstyn McDermott (Xoum)
* The Corpse-Rat King, Lee Battersby (Angry Robot)

Best Novella or Novelette

* “Flight 404”, Simon Petrie, in Flight 404/The Hunt for Red Leicester (Peggy Bright Books)
* “Significant Dust”, Margo Lanagan, in Cracklescape (Twelfth Planet Press)
* “Sky”, Kaaron Warren, in Through Splintered Walls (Twelfth Planet Press)

Best Short Story

* “Sanaa’s Army”, Joanne Anderton, in Bloodstones (Ticonderoga Publications)
* “The Wisdom of Ants”, Thoraiya Dyer, in Clarkesworld 75
* “The Bone Chime Song”, Joanne Anderton, in Light Touch Paper Stand Clear (Peggy Bright Books)
* “Oracle’s Tower”, Faith Mudge, in To Spin a Darker Stair (FableCroft Publishing)

Best Collected Work

* Cracklescape by Margo Lanagan, edited by Alisa Krasnostein (Twelfth Planet Press)
* Epilogue, edited by Tehani Wessely (FableCroft Publishing)
* Through Splintered Walls by Kaaron Warren, edited by Alisa Krasnostein (Twelfth Planet Press)
* Light Touch Paper Stand Clear, edited by Edwina Harvey and Simon Petrie (Peggy Bright Books)
* Midnight and Moonshine by Lisa L. Hannett and Angela Slatter, edited by Russell B. Farr (Ticonderoga Publications)
* The Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror 2011, edited by Liz Grzyb and Talie Helene (Ticonderoga Publications)

Best Artwork

* Cover art, Nick Stathopoulos, for Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine 56 (ASIM Collective)
* Cover art, Kathleen Jennings, for Midnight and Moonshine (Ticonderoga Publications)
* Illustrations, Adam Browne, for Pyrotechnicon (Coeur de Lion Publishing)
* Cover art and illustrations, Kathleen Jennings, for To Spin a Darker Stair (FableCroft Publishing)
* Cover art, Les Petersen, for Light Touch Paper Stand Clear (Peggy Bright Books)

Best Fan Writer

* Alex Pierce, for body of work including reviews in Australian Speculative Fiction in Focus
* Tansy Rayner Roberts, for body of work including reviews in Not If You Were The Last Short Story On Earth
* Grant Watson, for body of work including the “Who50” series in The Angriest
* Sean Wright, for body of work including reviews in Adventures of a Bookonaut

Best Fan Artist

* Kathleen Jennings, for body of work including “The Dalek Game” and “The Tamsyn Webb Sketchbook”

Best Fan Publication in Any Medium

* The Writer and the Critic, Kirstyn McDermott and Ian Mond
* Galactic Suburbia, Alisa Krasnostein, Tansy Rayner Roberts, and Alex Pierce
* Antipodean SF, Ion Newcombe
* The Coode Street Podcast, Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe
* Snapshot 2012, Alisa Krasnostein, Kathryn Linge, David McDonald, Helen Merrick, Ian Mond, Jason Nahrung et. al.
* Australian Speculative Fiction in Focus, Alisa Krasnostein, Tehani Wessely, et. al.
* Galactic Chat, Alisa Krasnostein, Tansy Rayner Roberts, and Sean Wright

Best New Talent

* David McDonald
* Faith Mudge
* Steve Cameron
* Stacey Larner

William Atheling Jr Award for Criticism or Review

* Alisa Krasnostein, Kathryn Linge, David McDonald, and Tehani Wessely, for review of Mira Grant’s Newsflesh, in ASIF
* Tansy Rayner Roberts, for “Historically Authentic Sexism in Fantasy. Let’s Unpack That.”, in tor.com
* David McDonald, Tansy Rayner Roberts, and Tehani Wessely, for the “New Who in Conversation” series
* Liz Grzyb and Talie Helene, for “The Year in Review”, in The Year’s Best Australian Fantasy and Horror 2011
* Rjurik Davidson, for “An Illusion in the Game for Survival”, a review of Reamde by Neal Stephenson, in The Age